Canadaway Creek Conservation Project 2011 a big success!

Thank you all for your work in making the Sixth Annual Canadaway Creek Conservation Project a big success!

This year had record number of  participants (109!) which were all very important in planting 225 dogwoods and willow trees and almost filling  a 30 yard dumpster! We also expanded the activities this year to incorporate the removal of invasive plant species in specific sections of the stream! What a great group of volunteers!



Schedule of this year’s events:

After everyone signed in, got their t-shirts, hats, gloves and maps,

Lunch was provided for all the workers.

 


This year’s event was highlighted by a presention by Dr. Ted Lee, a professor from State University of New York at Fredonia, who spoke about the invasive plant species in the area and about the healthy native alternatives.

The presentation was very stimulating and gave the group a great deal to think about. Many of the the children were excited that they could identify the invasive species as they walked along the creek collecting garbage. Everyone listened attentively to Ted’s words.


After the presentation, the group broke up into teams and began planting trees,

cleaning the stream,

and removing the invasive plant species.


It was a wonderful day and we look forward to seeing everyone and their friends next year!


Lampreys in Canadaway Creek

Here’s an image of lamprey in Canadaway Creek in June 2011 and here’s a movie of the same lamprey.

During the past two centuries, invasive species have significantly changed the Great Lakes ecosystem. In turn, the changes have had broad economic and social effects on people that rely on the system for food, water, and recreation.

An “invasive species” is a plant or animal that is non-native (or alien) to an ecosystem, and whose introduction is likely to cause economic, human health, or environmental damage in that ecosystem. Once established, it is extremely difficult to control their spread.

At least 25 non-native species of fish have entered the Great Lakes since the 1800s, including round goby, sea lamprey, Eurasian ruffe, alewife and others. These fish have had significant impacts on the Great Lakes food web by competing with native fish for food and habitat. Invasive animals have also been responsible for increased degradation of coastal wetlands; further degrading conditions are resulting in loss of plant cover and diversity.

Sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) are predaceous, eel-like fish native to the coastal regions of both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. They entered the Great Lakes through the Welland Canal about 1921. They contributed greatly to the decline of whitefish and lake trout in the Great Lakes. Since 1956, the governments of the United States and Canada, working jointly through the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, have implemented a successful sea lamprey control program.

Here’s two lampreys on a steelhead at the mouth of Canadaway back in 2006.

and here’s the results of their destruction on the fish that survive. Image from June 2011.

Check out www.flyfishergirl.com!

For the REAL fly fishing girl or woman or for that matter, any fly fisherman should check out this site!

Now listen to this and tell me if this isn’t a great story.

The website is run by Hannah Chloe Belford who is the head guide at the Damdochax River Lodge out of Smithers, British Columbia. Hannah and her mother Alice operate the lodge. Alice is the hostess, part-time guide, a certified healing touch practitioner, and a watercolor artist. Hannah is the head guide, the webmaster, an interior designer, and a graphic artist.

Alice has guided on this river for almost 30 years and Hannah for 17. Between the two, they have tailed thousands of steelhead, and countless numbers of other species. They absolutely love our jobs and careers, and would not consider doing anything other than what they do…… it’s their best lifestyle imaginable.

S.A.R.E.P. Youth Fly Fishing Field Trip – May 2011

This past May, we had a little outing with our youth group and a few community members. Along the way, we noticed some mayflies on the road.


The mentors worked with the kids on their casting before we hit the water.

We also discussed approaching the water, entomology and how to read the water before fishing.

Finn lands his first fish on a fly he tied!

On the lower pond, the brook trout were more selective but we were able to find some other beauties.

At the end of this beautiful day, we all realized that the trip wasn’t entirely about catching fish.

 

Artwork in Gray’s Sporting Journal

 

Here’s a look at the the two-page spread of the Biological Regionalism: Brook Trout II, Catskills, United States painting in the May/June 2011 issue of Gray’s Sporting Journal. Gray’s always does a nice job in their page design and reproduction. The work is available at the Russell Jinishian Gallery in Fairfield, CT.